Abstract

This study investigated the effects news media have on perceptions of cancer prevention for three generations: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. It explored the relationship between self-reported exposure to general news media and knowledge of cancer prevention by generation, the relationship between self-reported exposure to news media by generation, and the likelihood of participating in preventative actions. A snowball survey was distributed throughout Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Statistically significant relationships were found between exposure to news media pertaining to cancer and knowledge about cancer, as well as exposure to general news media and knowledge about cancer prevention. Differences between generations’ preference of news media and knowledge about cancer and prevention were not statistically significant. Avenues of further research are suggested.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Cancer--Prevention--Public opinion; Health in mass media

Publication Date

5-6-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Student Type

Graduate

Degree Name

Communication and Media Technologies (MS)

Department, Program, or Center

Department of Communication (CLA)

Advisor

Patrick Scanlon

Advisor/Committee Member

Rudy Pugliese

Advisor/Committee Member

Franz Foltz

Comments

Physical copy available from RIT's Wallace Library at RC268.15 .F47 2015

Campus

RIT – Main Campus

Plan Codes

COMMTCH-MS

COinS