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Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Abstract

Abstract

Objects such as snowflakes, castles, and butterflies have become more than just words when explored as a 3D print. The founder’s passion for braille led to the creation of the program See3D, which organizes the printing and distribution of 3D printed models for people who are blind. 3D prints such as DNA, cells, animals, constellations, telescopes, historic landmarks, logos, and maps were created to fulfill requests by people who are blind for tactile learning tools. Recipients shared their feedback on how to improve the models, and the printing and distribution service. See3D seeks to spread awareness about accessibility by presenting at technology fairs and demonstrating to students how to work 3D printers. A culmination of research and interactions with people who are blind, blindness organizations, educators, and scientists on how 3D printing has impacted those who are blind and sighted added to the development of See3D. Currently, See3D is a tax-exempt, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that has distributed more than 800 models to people in the United States and around the world, and continues to build its network of volunteers and collaborators.

Cover Page Footnote/Acknowledgments

See3D would like to acknowledge the following organizations: the GE Additive Education Program, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, Vora Ventures, IC3D, GeckoTek 3D Printer Build Plates, Polar3D, the Clovernook Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired (Cincinnati), the CSUN Assistive Technology Conference, The Ohio State University Entrepreneurial Business Law Clinic, and The Ohio State University Innovation Studio.

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