Abstract

Augmented Reality applications use explicit cuing to support visual search. Explicit cues can help improve visual search performance but they can also cause perceptual issues such as attentional tunneling. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the relationship between directing attention and attentional tunneling, in a dual task structure. One task was tracking a target in motion and the other was detection of non-target elements. Three conditions were tested: baseline without cuing the target, cuing the target with the average scene color, and using a red cue. A different color for the cue was used to vary the attentional tunneling level. The results show that directing attention induced attentional tunneling only the in red condition and that effect is attributable to the color used for the cue.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Attention; Augmented reality; Eye tracking

Publication Date

5-21-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Student Type

Graduate

Department, Program, or Center

Psychology (CLA)

Advisor

Andrew Herbert

Advisor/Committee Member

Jeff Pelz

Advisor/Committee Member

Reynold Bailey

Comments

Physical copy available from RIT's Wallace Library at BF321 .L36 2015

Campus

RIT – Main Campus

Plan Codes

EXPSYC-MS

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