Abstract

The hypothesis was that it is possible to create a unique PostScript Multiple Master font which makes a relatively smooth transition between serifed roman and italic letterforms. In the process of creating such a font, the author discovered new principles of Multiple Master font construction and new methodologies for ensuring smooth transitions. The methodology was to first construct a prototype, in order to explore the complications of such a project; the prototype metamorphosed between the roman and italic forms of the Adobe typeface Minion. For the actual project, roman and italic extremes were newly designed, loosely based on historical models dating from around 1540. The initial models for these fonts were found in a 16th century French edition of Livy's His tory of Rome, published by the Giunti family, from the Melbert B. Cary, Jr. Graphic Arts Collection. The models were scanned, and the digital bitmaps used as the starting point for the digital masters. Creation of the font involved a variety of software tools, on both Macintosh and Windows, notably Macromedia Fontographer. The written thesis project explores the technical and design problems and solutions uncovered in creation of both the prototype and the thesis project, and explaining how these add to the theory and principles of Multiple Master font construction. The thesis also: reviews the relationship between italic and roman typefaces; analyzes the success of the intermediate fonts between italic and roman; and displays printed samples of various steps in the design process, as well as the two final masters and three intermediate fonts at various levels of italicization.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Digital fonts; Type and type-founding--Digital techniques; Printing--Specimens

Publication Date

2-1-1997

Document Type

Thesis

Department, Program, or Center

School of Print Media (CIAS)

Advisor

Provan, Archie

Comments

Note: imported from RIT’s Digital Media Library running on DSpace to RIT Scholar Works. Physical copy available through RIT's The Wallace Library at: Z250.7 .P485 1997

Campus

RIT – Main Campus

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