Event Title

Dr. Jennifer Creech, University of Rochester. “Reproduction as Resistance: Motherhood in the East German Cinema.”

Location

Bamboo Room (2650) and Reading Room– Center for Campus Life

Start Date

24-4-2014 10:35 AM

End Date

24-4-2014 11:20 AM

Description

This talk is based on Professor Creech’s book manuscript, Mothers, Comrades and Outcasts: East German Women’s Films 1965 and Beyond, wherein she explores the function of these films as an alternative public sphere, in which official ideologies of socialist progress and utopian collectivism are resisted. Emerging after the cultural freeze of 1965, women’s films reveal a shift from overt political critique to a covert politics located in the intimate, problem-rich experiences of everyday life under socialism. Through an analysis Evelyn Schmidt’s The Bicycle (1980), Professor Creech shows how films that focus on so-called “women’s concerns” – marital problems, motherhood, the “second shift,” emancipation and residual patriarchy – use female protagonists to critique dominant ideologies of socialist subjectivity.

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Apr 24th, 10:35 AM Apr 24th, 11:20 AM

Dr. Jennifer Creech, University of Rochester. “Reproduction as Resistance: Motherhood in the East German Cinema.”

Bamboo Room (2650) and Reading Room– Center for Campus Life

This talk is based on Professor Creech’s book manuscript, Mothers, Comrades and Outcasts: East German Women’s Films 1965 and Beyond, wherein she explores the function of these films as an alternative public sphere, in which official ideologies of socialist progress and utopian collectivism are resisted. Emerging after the cultural freeze of 1965, women’s films reveal a shift from overt political critique to a covert politics located in the intimate, problem-rich experiences of everyday life under socialism. Through an analysis Evelyn Schmidt’s The Bicycle (1980), Professor Creech shows how films that focus on so-called “women’s concerns” – marital problems, motherhood, the “second shift,” emancipation and residual patriarchy – use female protagonists to critique dominant ideologies of socialist subjectivity.