Abstract

We report the serendipitous detection by the XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory of an X-ray source at the position of the Type I (He- and N-rich) bipolar planetary nebula Hb 5. The Hb 5 X-ray source appears marginally resolved. While the small number of total counts (~170) and significant off-axis angle of the X-ray source (~7.8') precludes a definitive spatial analysis, the morphology of the X-ray emission appears to trace the brightest features seen in optical images of Hb 5. The X-ray spectrum is indicative of a thermal plasma at a temperature between 2.4 and 3.7 MK and appears to display strong Neon emission. The inferred X-ray luminosity is L_X = 1.5 x 10^32 ergs/s. These results suggest that the detected X-ray emission is dominated by shock-heated gas in the bipolar nebula, although we cannot rule out the presence of a point-like component at the position of the central star. The implications for and correspondence with current models of shock-heated gas in planetary nebulae is discussed.

Publication Date

2009

Comments

Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal. Also archived in: arXiv:0901.4095v1 [astro-ph.SR]Note: imported from RIT’s Digital Media Library running on DSpace to RIT Scholar Works in February 2014.

Document Type

Article

Department, Program, or Center

Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science (COS)

Campus

RIT – Main Campus

Share

COinS