Authors

Susan Foster

Abstract

In their history of education for deaf people in the United States and Europe, Moores and Kluwin (1986) note that many elements of what educators today call 'mainstreaming,' are not new practices. For example, the earliest residential schools for deaf children were established as day schools. They were usually built in metropolitan areas, thus enabling a proportion of students to live at home. Other deaf children were educated within schools designed to serve primarily non-disabled students... This is an excerpt from Chapter 3 in the book "Integration, Myth, or Reality?"

Publication Date

1989

Comments

Note: imported from RIT’s Digital Media Library running on DSpace to RIT Scholar Works in February 2014.

Document Type

Book Chapter

Department, Program, or Center

American Sign Language and Interpreting Education (NTID)

Campus

RIT – Main Campus

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